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25 books on climate change (Old is Gold 2006-2020) – Readers list 4

When we read the news about how much time we have to try to avoid irreversible, devastating climate change, we may feel overwhelmed, especially if we wish to limit our carbon footprint or take action to save the environment. There are many climate change books that are outlined for this topic (old is gold), and at times you may like the writing style of an author more than the other, or maybe the overall presentation. So before putting up this script I would like to thank all the fellow friends who have helped me add these books which are not included in the Readers List 1, 2, and 3. These books are supposed to be thrilling ones.

Just to give you a recap, this blog is part 4 of the Climate Change Readers list. Those who have not explored the books that I have highlighted in the previous 15 Climate Change Books to read in 2022 – Readers list 1 are encouraged to do so.

A short disclaimer; I haven't read all the books and I have compiled these titles basis the recommondation that I recieved from my fellow climate enthusiasts and readers. I have only read first 7 books out of the listed 30.

The following 25 books on climate change are excellent resources to read when you feel helpless about what you can do to help protect our environment – as well as to share with friends and family who are still trying to comprehend the threat of climate change.

#1

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History

An important work that combines intellectual history and natural history with reporting on the field to give us an accurate picture of the mass extinction unfolding right before our eyes. The diversity of life on earth abruptly and dramatically decreased five times over the last half a billion years.

The sixth extinction is now being monitored around the world by researchers. This is predicted to be the most devastating event since the asteroid impact which wiped out the dinosaurs. However, this time it is humans who are responsible for the disaster.

A decade’s worth of research from Elizabeth draws on dozens of disciplines, as she goes on field trips with many of them: geologists studying deep ocean cores, botanists following the tree line up the Andes, marine biologists diving off the Great Barrier Reef. The Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino are among the species she introduces, some extinct already and others in danger of disappearing.

In these stories, Kolbert traces the origins of the concept of extinction, first articulated in revolutionary Paris by the scientist Georges Cuvier through to the present day, through a moving account of disappearances. Kolbert observes that humanity’s sixth extinction will likely be its most lasting legacy; it forces us to rethink our defining characteristics as humans.

AuthorElizabeth Kolbert
Pages336
My completion time28 Days
My personal rating4.5 out of 5.0 stars

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15 climate change books (The hidden gems) – Readers list 3

Feeling overwhelmed and out of the loop regarding how climate change affects you on a daily basis? I understand, when you read through various available lists from the internet, there are a lot of those obvious books that everyone recommends. Here is a list of my 15 climate change books which I feel are the most unnoticed books, but trust me these hidden gems have taken my breaths apart.

Just to give you a recap, this blog is part 3 of the Climate Change Readers list. Those who have not explored the books that I have highlighted in the previous 15 Climate Change Books to read in 2022 – Readers list 1 are encouraged to do so or to already have.

These books have exemplary things to tell you, and t is a definite read.

#1

The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable

How else could we explain our inability to imagine a better future in the face of global warming if we were not deranged? This is the question raised by renowned Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh.

Ghosh examines the human inability to comprehend the scale and violence of climate change in his first nonfiction work since In an Antique Land. He claims that today’s extreme weather patterns are incapable of accommodating contemporary modes of thinking and imagining because of their extreme nature. In serious literary fiction, such improbability feels especially inapplicable: tornadoes and hundred-year storms are automatically relegated to other genres when they occur.

Several gross simplifications have been made in the writing of history as well; as Ghosh demonstrates, the history of the carbon economy is a tangled, contradictory, and counterintuitive one. To limit fiction and politics to individual moral adventure comes with a price, as Ghosh explains. In much the same way, he argues, politics has become a matter of personal moral reckoning rather than collective action. He argues that fiction is better suited to the task of imagining alternative worlds than any other type of culture. His book serves as a call to action for the greatest writer of our time.

AuthorAmitav Ghosh
Pages176
My completion time9 Days
My personal rating4.5 out of 5.0 stars

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