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At current rate of climate change, by when all arctic ice will melt?

It is difficult to predict exactly when all the Arctic ice will melt as it depends on various factors such as global greenhouse gas emissions, the rate at which the Earth’s temperature increases, and the feedback effects of the melting ice. However, it is expected that the Arctic will be free of sea ice in the summer months within the next few decades.

Sea ice extent is a measure of the area of the Earth’s oceans that is covered by sea ice. Sea ice is frozen seawater that forms in the polar regions of the Earth, and it is an important component of the Earth’s climate system. Sea ice forms in the winter when the temperature of the ocean surface drops below the freezing point of seawater, and it melts in the summer when the temperature of the ocean surface rises above the freezing point.

The Arctic sea ice has been melting at an alarming rate in recent years, with the minimum summer sea ice extent (the smallest area of sea ice that is present in the Arctic during the summer) declining by 13% per decade since the late 1970s. In September 2020, the minimum summer sea ice extent reached a new record low, with only 1.44 million square miles (3.74 million square kilometers) of ice remaining. This is the equivalent of losing an area of ice the size of Texas and Oklahoma combined every year.

This graph comparing results from climate models shows that the actual downward trend of Arctic sea ice decline continues to exceed what most models predicted.Courtesy Stroeve et al., Geophysical Research Letters

Climate change is definitely affecting winds and ocean currents, and that these changes can contribute to the melting of Arctic sea ice. As the Earth’s climate warms, it can lead to changes in atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns, which can affect the strength and direction of winds and ocean currents. These changes can also have a variety of impacts on the Earth’s climate and weather patterns.

The way the change in climate is happening, it can impact the melting of Arctic sea ice is by altering the temperature difference between the equator and the poles. As the Earth’s climate warms, the temperature difference between the equator and the poles is expected to decrease, which could lead to a slowing down of the jet streams, the wind patterns that flow from west to east around the Earth at high altitudes in the mid-latitudes. This could lead to changes in weather patterns, such as more extreme heatwaves and cold snaps in some regions.

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